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Broadening Horizons Ages 16-18

Cambridge Summer School 2019
Also in Oxford | London


An academic summer programme for students aged 16-18 offering 30 subject options and a full activities timetable.

2 or 4 weeks | Available July - August 2019

  • Live, dine and study in colleges of the University of Cambridge
  • Expert tutoring from ORA's English faculty
  • 30 subject options to choose from - tailor your course
  • Talks and debates with world-class guest speakers
  • A truly international environment - over 135 nationalities in 2018
  • Inspirational cultural programme

Course Summary

Oxford Royale Academy's world-renowned Broadening Horizons course offers students aged 16-18 the opportunity to study a combination of subjects of their choice, selecting from over 30 available options ranging from Archaeology to Neuroscience. This provides a perfect opportunity for students to pursue areas of interest in more detail or to try out something brand new.

Morning lessons in small study groups are combined with interactive afternoon workshops and masterclasses to provide a rounded educational experience that covers core personal skills as well as in-depth academic knowledge in your chosen subjects. With over 30 subjects to choose from (see 'topics covered' below) along with four possible outstanding venues, build your perfect course this summer with the Broadening Horizons Programme.

What to expect from the Broadening Horizons course

The Broadening Horizons programme is Oxford Royale Academy’s most flexible summer course, allowing multiple subjects to be combined to produce a unique itinerary powered by individual preference.

Students select two unique Morning Subject options (one from List A and one from List B) and an Afternoon Workshop to personalise the course around their interests. The variety offered makes Broadening Horizons our most popular summer course due to the ability to improve existing subject skills or try something brand new.

Morning Subjects take place in small study groups, whilst Afternoon Workshops are comprised typically of larger groups participating in interactive, practical activities. The varied structure ensures both group and individual learning, alongside gaining a diverse set of skills throughout the course.

Course Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will have:

  • Experienced a flexible summer programme with a combination of multiple subjects
  • Gained knowledge and experience to boost their academic performance
  • Tried out new subjects of their choice
  • Improved their practical skills
  • Developed a deeper appreciation of their chosen subjects
  • Honed their public speaking, debating, writing or leadership skills in their chosen workshop area
  • Made friends for life and formed a global network of the leaders of the future

Topics Covered

Students may choose one subject from List A, one (different) subject from List B, and one afternoon workshop. Click on the links below to learn more about each subject option.

Please note that, where a subject appears in both List A and List B, it is not possible to choose the same subject from both lists. For example, it is not possible to choose List A Mathematics and List B Mathematics. All option choices must be unique.

This academic course explores one of the most exciting and promising technologies of the 21st century, looking into the use and abuse of blockchain technology from multiple different perspectives. Students will begin by looking into the technical and mathematical details of how the blockchain functions, as well as the other new technologies, such as greater data transfer and storage capacities, that have enabled blockchain to become viable. Following this, they will consider the myriad uses to which this technology can be put, from the positive uses - such as the charities using blockchain to ensure their donations reach the intended recipients, to the negative - such as those who use blockchain technology to enable organised crime. Finally, students enrolled on this course will learn about the societal impact this technology has already had, and the consequences its use may have in the future.

Blockchain is an emerging technology that governments and policymakers have, in some cases, been slow to respond to. Students will be encouraged to use blockchain as an example of how the technologies of the future may take us by surprise in the ways in which they affect our daily lives, and consider how those in positions of political, social and economic power should best respond to disruptive technology as it appears in future. Students can also analyse the impacts of comparable technologies in the past to forecast where the further development of blockchain could take us.

This cutting-edge course is truly interdisciplinary, covering computer science, politics, sociology, economics and more, all explored and analysed through the lens of blockchain technology. At the end of this course, students will have learned valuable new skills for analysing a complex and novel subject from a multidisciplinary perspective and will thoroughly understand blockchain technology, its uses and its ongoing impact on our society.

This exciting Economics Summer Course in Cambridge has been designed to introduce students to basic economic theory while also looking at the way in which it is applied, to help students understand current economic issues, from unemployment to the benefits and disadvantages of the Eurozone.

Over two weeks, students will look at a range of topics in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international economics. In microeconomics, students will look at the basic economic problem of scarcity and choice, supply and demand, different models of market structure, the occurrence of market failure (e.g. due to the absence of markets for public goods, problems of information, and externalities), and the incidence and effectiveness of government intervention. In macroeconomics, students will learn about about policy objectives, the AD-AS model, and the operation of an independent central bank. Finally, in international economics, students will learn about about trade, protectionism and exchange rates. A great deal of ground is covered in these two weeks, spurring students to take their new-found economic curiosity further once they leave Cambridge.

This Experimental Psychology course follows the pioneers of the field in seeking answers to some of life's most intriguing questions, giving students the opportunity to study, discuss and debate issues of identity, consciousness, morality, and more.

Experimental Psychologists have addressed some of the most intriguing questions of life: What makes you you? What makes you different from other people? Is there always a clear difference between Good and Evil? This class provides students with the opportunity to study, discuss and debate these alongside a wide range of other fascinating and controversial issues.

This course will cover some of the most fundamental psychological concepts and introduce some of the most influential theorists. Students are encouraged to evaluate the material critically, to engage in discussion and debate, to gain insight into their own personalities and development and to relate the material to their own lives and experiences. Topics will be explored through a combination of structured teaching, varied activities and exercises, class discussion, and video sessions.

This Mathematics summer course in Cambridge is designed for students with a keen interest in Mathematics. Our focus will be on the introduction of basic concepts from higher mathematics, on the development and practise of critical thinking skills, and on fun and exciting topics that the student is not likely to be taught on a standard school curriculum.

The class introduces several different facets of modern mathematics; students will encounter important ideas in arithmetic, geometry, graph theory, logic, computer science, and game theory, to name a few. Students will also solve riddles and critical thinking puzzles, draw tessellations and fractals, play strategic mathematical games, and even get the chance to build a primitive computer! The aim is to give students more confidence and curiosity towards the subject of mathematics for the future. Students will see how mathematics is evident in art, music and nature as they learn to think visually and imaginatively about the subject.

This summer Medical Biology course is designed for students who wish to extend their knowledge and understanding of the science behind modern medical practice, encouraging students to consider human health and its wider impact more broadly.

The course uses class discussion, debates, presentations, role plays and written work to explore topics that students might not have encountered before, and to encourage students to think more broadly about human health and how it relates to wider social, political and environmental factors. The lessons aim to be an interactive and challenging introduction to medical sciences, and students are expected to get involved in discussions and to participate fully in class activities.

The Medical Biology course consists of ten 90-minute sessions, in which the following topics are covered: diabetes, arterial disease, heart attacks and strokes, infectious diseases, brain diseases, the the designing of medical research studies, and medical imaging techniques. Students will even have the opportunity to participate in a hands-on heart dissection, should they wish to try this.

This course provides the perfect introduction for students who are thinking of pursuing future careers such as nursing, pharmacology, midwifery, nutrition or medical technology, or indeed broader related fields such as public health or global development. It may also be of interest to students who have settled on a path in the sciences and who are unsure which specialism they might like to pursue in future. Of course, having future plans that relate to medical biology is not essential for taking this course; it has relevance in all of our lives and students may wish to pursue it out of pure intellectual curiosity and the desire for a challenge.

This physics summer course aims to introduce students to aspects of physics beyond what is taught in most schools, introducing them to topics encountered at a degree level in order to give an impression of the current state of modern physics and its most intellectually challenging -and rewarding- aspects.

The class contains very little overlap with conventional high school physics. The physics covered in high school is over two hundred years old. It can be archaic and boring, yet physics today is on the brink of exciting new discoveries. For students to gain an appreciation of physics, it is best that they are exposed to the ideas and problems of modern physics which are covered in class.

The structure of this physics summer course is based mainly on discussion and worksheets, with one homework sheet and one student presentation. Problem solving in groups captures the activity of research physics well, and this is why group worksheets in class are an important part of the curriculum. The homework and presentation give the students further opportunity to test their understanding, and to research and explain to their peers topics not covered in the classes.

During the first four days, the underlying ideas of relativistic physics are introduced. During the next three days quantum physics is introduced and analysed from perspectives of philosophy and technological applications. On the remaining days, a survey of other major areas of physics is offered for discussion.

This Politics summer course is designed to introduce students to the academic disciplines of Political Science and International Relations, exposing them to the methods of social scientific enquiry and contemporary issues dominating the discipline.

Over the course of two weeks, the classes build a progressive understanding from the foundations of Political Science to some of the most pressing issues faced in the field of International Relations.

Week One

During the first week, students examine basic academic principles; the focus thereafter is on the development of international politics, with classes exploring issues such as the consequences of globalization, human rights, the ethical dilemma of torture, and the evolution of modern warfare (with particular emphasis on counter-terrorism legislation).

Week Two

In their second week students on this politics summer course will study the conceptual basis of global governance, present to their peers on a major international institution, and participate in a class debate on whether or not war can be just.

This Chemistry summer course focuses on strengthening core concepts as well as introducing new and exciting topics, to go beyond what students might have had a chance to cover at school.

The course aims to give students more confidence and foster curiosity about pursuing the subject in their future studies; no one should leave this course under the impression that Chemistry is boring. The course uses class discussions, debates, presentations, role plays and written work to explore topics that students will not have encountered before in their academic career. It encourages students to think broadly and to apply transferable skills both within the Broadening Horizons programme and in their future academic studies.

As all teachers are qualified at least to Masters level, they will be happy to answer students’ questions concerning Chemistry, even if it is not within the purview of the course as specified above. Teachers will also be able to give advice on university applications, interview questions, and the plethora of careers that are open to Chemistry graduates.

This History summer course takes students through the most important global events and processes which have taken place since the end of the Second World War, from the Cold War to the decolonisation process, the rise of China, the Middle Eastern conflicts, and the response of the international community to the rise of terrorism.

The course will seek to encourage students to think more like professional historians: students will read original primary sources, and be introduced to the debates which continue to divide historians about the best way in which to interpret events that continue to shape our world today. The class looks at processes which gave rise to major international bodies like the UN and the European Union. It also explores the most significant international conflicts of recent decades such as the Vietnam War and the Israel-Palestine conflict. Special emphasis is placed on the most recent events, including the rise of global terrorism and the Iraq war.

Each session on this course will consist of brief talks by the tutor, intended to provide students with background information on the subject, and group discussions. This course also uses video material from the British Pathé archive in order to bring the past to life. Asking questions and engaging in debate is very much supported, as this is a world history course, and each student, coming from a different home country and background, will be encourage to bring their own unique insights to this history summer course.

Trading in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies has made some people wealthy, while causing others to lose staggering sums from unwise trades. It’s been criticised for its huge energy costs, but also praised as the future of money supply in a world where fiat currency can be an unreliable store of wealth and other forms of electronic transaction can have privacy and security risks. Its true impact on the economy remains to be seen.

It’s all of these factors in combination that make cryptocurrency a fruitful and interesting area for academic study. This course, at the very cutting-edge of modern technology, will introduce students to the world of cryptocurrency and equip them with the knowledge and skills they need to understand how it works and analyse its impacts.

Students studying this course will learn how the field of economics has changed in the 21st century, setting the context for the emergence of cryptocurrency and using this understanding to explore the consequences that the development of cryptocurrencies has already had and may continue to have in future. Using cryptocurrency as an example, students will also explore the phenomenon of economic bubbles: how they develop, how to spot them, how to avoid them and how they can be mitigated or leveraged. They will learn about different types of cryptocurrency and explore how they differ.

At the micro level, students will consider how cryptocurrency, as a private and secure means of payment, can be used either for good or to enable organised crime and evade government detection. At a societal level, they will consider how such dual-use technologies can be appropriately regulated by government without losing their economic and social benefits, and debate how much regulation is appropriate. This course gives students the economic, social and technological context for a holistic understanding of cryptocurrency.

This exciting Economics Summer Course in Cambridge has been designed to introduce students to basic economic theory while also looking at the way in which it is applied, to help students understand current economic issues, from unemployment to the benefits and disadvantages of the Eurozone.

Over two weeks, students will look at a range of topics in microeconomics, macroeconomics and international economics. In microeconomics, students will look at the basic economic problem of scarcity and choice, supply and demand, different models of market structure, the occurrence of market failure (e.g. due to the absence of markets for public goods, problems of information, and externalities), and the incidence and effectiveness of government intervention. In macroeconomics, students will learn about about policy objectives, the AD-AS model, and the operation of an independent central bank. Finally, in international economics, students will learn about about trade, protectionism and exchange rates. A great deal of ground is covered in these two weeks, spurring students to take their new-found economic curiosity further once they leave Cambridge.

Students on this demanding Genetics course will gain an understanding of human evolution while being introduced to advanced concepts such as genetic engineering.

During the course, students will explore DNA and proteins, and how these form the building blocks of the body. They will learn about genes and chromosomes, gaining an insight into how genetic mutations lead to certain medical conditions and syndromes. They will also be introduced to genome sequencing and to some of the on-going research projects in the field of genetics, such as the 100,000 Genomes Project currently being run by the NHS.

This Mathematics summer course in Cambridge is designed for students with a keen interest in Mathematics. Our focus will be on the introduction of basic concepts from higher mathematics, on the development and practise of critical thinking skills, and on fun and exciting topics that the student is not likely to be taught on a standard school curriculum.

The class introduces several different facets of modern mathematics; students will encounter important ideas in arithmetic, geometry, graph theory, logic, computer science, and game theory, to name a few. Students will also solve riddles and critical thinking puzzles, draw tessellations and fractals, play strategic mathematical games, and even get the chance to build a primitive computer! The aim is to give students more confidence and curiosity towards the subject of mathematics for the future. Students will see how mathematics is evident in art, music and nature as they learn to think visually and imaginatively about the subject.

Students on this challenging Neuroscience course will explore the complex workings of the human brain, covering difficult issues including memory, the storage of information, the role of sleep, and how emotions and pain affect neural pathways.

Over the course of two weeks, students will build up an understanding of the brain's structure and how it functions. After studying the anatomy of the human brain, they will then learn about how different parts of the brain control movement and emotions. They will also explore memory and how the brain learns and stores information, why the brain needs sleep, and now neural pathways form responses to emotions and pain.

As part of this course, students will study nerve cells and the way in which they transmit information, as well as considering how they may be affected by illness and drugs. In this context, students will look at the relationship between the brain and the spinal cord, as well as gaining an appreciation of sensory systems such as vision, touch and hearing.

Students will have the opportunity to carry out practical experiments – such as an eye dissection – to illuminate what they have learned, providing hands-on scientific research experience that will come in useful at university and beyond. The course is ideal for students who are aiming to study medicine, human biology or medicine-related degrees at university, as well as those with a more general interest in biology or science.

Over the course of the exciting Software and App Development option, students will learn the basics of software programming and app development, increasingly fundamental to modern society, and take a big step toward skills that could one day guarantee employment.

With a much talked-about skills shortage in this ever-growing field, participation on this course will enable students to take a big step towards equipping themselves with the knowledge they’ll need to secure a job on graduation.

For those wishing to pursue software development at university or as a career, our teachers will be on hand to answer questions on how to pursue further studies in software and app development.

The Academic Writing summer course is the perfect choice for any student looking to add that extra polish to their course work, personal statement or exam essays. The workshop complements any of the morning subjects on the Broadening Horizons course, helping improve students’ writing skills for a broad spectrum of subjects.

The ability to write a clear, coherent, and persuasive essay in good English is crucial in many areas of academia and beyond. This workshop is designed to assist students in the development of this key skill. Under guidance from ORA’s expert teacher, students will hone their abilities through such activities as:

  • discussing what makes a “good” essay, including grammatical constructions and paragraph presentation;
  • study of academic writing conventions, such as formatting a bibliography and how to avoid plagiarism;
  • writing short essays for assessment, and peer-reviewing them as a class.

Essay styles and best practices vary widely around the world; the skills that make for a good essay by the standards and norms of one country’s academic environment might not hold in another. Therefore, any student from outside the UK who is considering moving to an English school or going to university in the UK would be well advised to give themselves a head start by learning the style that British teachers, lecturers and admissions tutors will prefer.

The skill of writing a good essay is hard to master, but once learned, is immensely valuable. Having good ideas is only half the battle; presenting them in an engaging, persuasive and mature way is the other half, and it is equally crucial. The conventions of academic English, such as the strict avoidance of the first person, the differing use of tenses in History and English essays, or the correct tone for a scientific report, can be mystifying and ignorance of them can lose a student a significant number of marks before they have been grasped. In this workshop, students will learn these conventions so that they can write essays in the preferred academic style.

A summer course designed for students aged 16-18 with a keen interest in business and entrepreneurship.

Our dynamic Business Challenge workshop has been designed to get students thinking about what makes a good business strategy, as they start up their own entrepreneurial brainchild and test it against the practical realities of business management. Students are divided into groups for the challenge, and much negotiate real-life obstacles such as marketing, budgeting, and the importance of leadership and teamwork in a business context. Within this context students are encouraged to be innovative and consider their own role in the launching of a hypothetical new product.

Students have the opportunity to develop any idea of their group’s choice, in order to exercise their creativity to the full. Each group will be expected to present some detailed written work, which will be produced collaboratively, and make a formal presentation to the judges and other students. This reflects the skillset required of entrepreneurs in real life and helps students improve their own approach to management and enterprise. Students can expect to increase their confidence in themselves and in their ideas as their presentation and sales skills are honed.

Each group will be expected to present a brief in which they describe their product, outline their mission statement and corporate objectives, present a marketing audit consisting of their own primary and secondary research, outline their marketing objectives and marketing strategy as well as how much finance they require. The workshops will use a variety of visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities, tasks and skills to help all learners participate effectively. The main aim of the workshop is to consolidate their class-based learning and encourage students to be business leaders – creative, innovative and team-spirited.

This course gives students the opportunity to examine the issues that dominate headlines around the world, from the global economy to current political controversies, as well as development and sustainability.

This course has been designed to introduce students to some of the most important environmental, economic, social, and political concerns of modern life. Through a series of seminars, students will have the opportunity to examine the issues that dominate headlines around the world, from the global economy to current political controversies, as well as development and sustainability. Whatever a student’s particular political interests, they should find themselves engaged by this wide-reaching course.

The concept of development is used throughout this course to illustrate how different global issues can be interrelated and to emphasise the fact that international politics now places more emphasis on global rather than regional relationships.

The seminar series is composed of two major units, consisting of key sessions on development and sustainability and current political and economic controversies. During the first week students examine the basics of development and sustainability, and in the second week you will discuss major issues in global affairs. To develop an awareness of competing views about how global issues can be best tackled, students examine the themes of ageing and of the environment. In the second week students discuss major issues in global affairs, focusing on the role of civil society in the Arab world and in recession-plunged Europe. To explore the emergence of new global security threats, students examine the concepts of energy, regime and economic security.

The course is suitable for both those seeking general exposure to the issues that are dominating the headlines around the world, from the global economy and current political controversies, to development and sustainability and for those who aim to pursue further education in the field of development politics and international relations.

This Leadership and Teambuilding course replicates contexts that students are likely to encounter in their future academic, professional, and social development, equipping them with lessons from great leaders of the past.

This course involves activities, games and exercises that aim to develop principles of teamwork and leadership, replicating contexts that students are likely to encounter in their future academic, professional, and social development. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own experiences, as well as to look at the behavioural styles of famous leaders.

In this course students consider what it really means to be a part of a team, and what attitudes and insights they might need if they were placed in a position of leadership. In addition to practical team-building activities, students are also required to reflect upon and discuss the more theoretical elements of leadership. These two elements will be used in conjunction with each other to allow students to replicate the kinds of situations faced during everyday life, as well as discuss and evaluate their performance. It goes without saying that these transferable skills will be of immense use to students even outside the classroom.

In spite of its more serious elements, the course is also designed to allow students to enjoy themselves and have the opportunity to get to know their peers as they work together to solve the tasks that the workshop leader throws at them. Students come from a wealth of diverse backgrounds, and the the unique insights that this provides can be used to great advantage over the course of the workshops.

In this course, students focus on developing their presentation and advocacy skills: an understanding of how to plan a speech; build a strong and persuasive argument; and to give a convincing speech, with plenty of practice to build confidence for the future.

Over two weeks, students will work on practical aspects of speech giving, such as body language, clarity of delivery and maintaining eye contact with their audience. Students gain wide-ranging experience of public speaking and debate, and by the end of the course they have a firm grounding in essential skills and feel confident in their ability to take on new challenges.

In each session students are shown new techniques and strategies, and then given plenty of opportunities to put these into practice. Sessions are structured so that there is plenty of time for questions and discussion; this approach is central to all ORA courses, but none more so than Public Speaking and Debate, where the chance to speak up is paramount. The two-week period leads up to a formal debating competition for the whole class on a chosen subject.

The course also looks at a variety of famous speeches from history up to the present day to see how famous speakers have used various techniques, and what students can learn from their success: Martin Luther King’s ‘I have a dream’ and Julia Gillard’s ‘misogyny speech’ are both rigorously analysed.

The workshop debates address a variety of issues, ranging from easily accessible topics (e.g. the length of school holidays or the value of school uniform) to more complex and challenging social issues (the death penalty, euthanasia, the legalisation of drugs) as the students’ confidence increases.

Students will work alongside peers from across the world, often from very different cultures and backgrounds. This is a valuable opportunity to learn respectful discourse with those who hold different beliefs – crucial when discussing delicate social and political problems in debate.

Take this course if...

Take this course if you are looking for a flexible summer programme and the ability to combine multiple subjects of your choice.

Welcome to the City of Cambridge - your home this summer

students walking through a small street in front of the King's College, Cambridge

Cambridge has been recognised for centuries as one of the most beautiful academic locations in the UK. With its soaring gothic buttresses, green lawns, gently meandering river, and quiet little coffee shops, Cambridge has a lot to offer in terms of quality of student experience.

Students will live, dine and study in a college of the University of Cambridge, providing them with the ideal opportunity to discover what life in a top UK university is really like. Students can immerse themselves in the teaching of knowledgeable academics, many of whom have studied at top UK institutions such as Cambridge and Oxford. They will have plenty of opportunity to explore the city in their free time, and take part in educational excursions in and around Cambridge.

Students residential in Cambridge will experience life in a top UK university city, while fulfilling their educational ambitions and enjoying the summer experience of their lives. Learn more about all that our Cambridge Summer School has to offer.

A Cambridge college dining hall
Punts lined up on the River Cam in Cambridge
Students smiling at the camera in front of the King's College, Cambridge?

Useful information for students & parents

Accommodation

Students will be accommodated in comfortable single or twin rooms depending on their allocated college (please contact our registrations team if you would like more information on this). Twin rooms are strictly shared by students of the same gender, and males/females are separated by corridor and/or staircase. Accommodation is the standard for undergraduates studying at the university, so students are able to get a taste of what being an Cambridge student might be like. Bathrooms are typically shared between students of the same gender, however in some cases en-suite facilities are available.

Pastoral care & student welfare

The programme is overseen by the Programme Director, who implements the day-to-day running of the programme. The Director is assisted by a team of Counsellors who ensure that students are looked after pastorally, culturally and socially during their programme. Students are able to talk informally and frankly to the Counsellors in order to raise concerns or to find out further information about their course. Each campus has members of residential staff who live on campus throughout the programme and are able to assist students at any time of the day or night.

Eligibility & pre-requisites

Students on this course:

  • Must conform to our age policy.
  • Must be fluent or near-fluent English language speakers – if you are unsure whether your English level is suitable for this programme, please contact our Registrations Team on admin@oxford-royale.co.uk and they will be able to assist you.
  • Must be able to fulfil the basic requirements of the programme, in terms of attendance at lessons, meals and events. Please contact our Registrations Team for more detailed information.
  • Should check the prerequisites of each option they select before enrolling, to ensure they possess the necessary knowledge to benefit from the subject matter discussed in the classes.

Our Teaching Faculty

At Oxford Royale Academy we are committed to providing our students with the most qualified and high-calibre teaching faculty available. All Oxford Royale Academy teachers are passionate about their subjects, and are looking forward to passing their knowledge on to their students this summer! For full details of last summer’s teaching faculty, please click here

Guest Lectures & Debates

At ORA, we go the extra mile to enhance the study abroad experience of our students. As part of this, every year our dedicated Events Team organises a series of fascinating guest lectures. Guest speakers come from a wide range of backgrounds and specialisms, including the worlds of online media, television and academia. Our students also have the opportunity to watch and participate in a number of debates, which take place on campus. These range from formal Panel Debates, involving teaching faculty and other staff, to informal discussions about current “hot topics” led by Counsellors.

Coach Excursions

The United Kingdom has a rich cultural heritage, and a course with Oxford Royale Academy is the perfect way for a young learner to explore this. All ORA courses include at least one coach excursion to places of historical and social significance in the UK. O

Extra-curricular Activities

At ORA, we never forget that our students are on holiday! Included with every ORA course is an extra-curricular timetable, carefully designed by our dedicated Events Team to ensure our students have fun, make friends and get the most out of their time with us.

Find out more

Find out more Immigration & Visas

Information and advice on securing your student visa.

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Find out more Arrival & Departure

Information about how to travel to and from an ORA summer course.

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Find out more Airport Transfers

Details of transfers between ORA and Heathrow Airport.

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Find out more FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

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Broadening Horizons for Ages 16-18 | Cambridge is residential in the following venues:

(If your course takes place in more than one campus in the same city and you would like to know more about which location you will be allocated, please call our registrations team)

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